Tattoos – Techniques of Application

Tattoos – Techniques, Tattooing is a widely practiced method of body decoration in which markings such as signs, symbols and letters are applied to the body by puncturing the skin’s outer layer and inserting color into it. Whether ancient or modern techniques are used, the skin is punctured with a sharp instrument, now usually an electric moved needle. In earlier times and other cultures, Tattooing required one or more needles fixed to a stick and driven into the skin by slight tapping, the very process that has led to the term Tattoo via the early Polynesian sound – equivalent of the tapping action: Tau Tau.
A variety of methods were used to create tattoos. In a classic example of tribal tattoo evolution, among the Sioux, for example, women would draw a circle or line on a person’s skin with clay, punch the design with an awl, and then rub the blue clay over it. By the time the clay was dry it would have penetrated beneath the awl holes. Among California natives, an old woman would scratch the skin of a subject and rub charcoal dust or plant juice into the scratches for color. Following the contact with Europeans, the Ojibwas drew on the skin with a stick dipped in gunpowder dissolved in water. The figure was then pricked with needle dipped in vermilion and the skin was seared with punk wood to prevent festering. The area would then be treated with an antiseptic herbal wash. These processes often took number of days.

Concerning all tribal tattoo styles, the division in black and white is important. Not only of what has been tattooed must have a good shape but also the parts that have been left Blanc must also be well shaped. Besides, it is more beautiful that the shapes follow your body contours. The balance with tribal and Ornamentals are very important. For this reason, it is important to have a tattoo done by someone who understands the different styles.

In technical terms, tattooing is micro-pigment implantation. Tattoos are a type of body modification. A tattoo is a design in ink or some other pigment, usually decorative or symbolic, placed permanently under the skin.
The origin of the word Tattoo is usually traced to the Tahitian taut or tatau, which means to mark or strike. The term tattoo is now universally used, even if it is referred to, in any specific language by some other word.

The most popular scientist Thomas Edison designed the pioneering electric engraving pen, which was developed further by Samuel O’Reilly in 1891. Today, the most common method of tattooing is with an electric tattoo machine. In this procedure, ink is inserted into the skin via a group of needles that are soldered onto a bar, which is attached to an oscillating unit. The unit rapidly and repeatedly drives the needles in and out of the skin, usually 50 to 3,000 times a minute. Tattoo machines operate on an electromagnetic principle.

All these forms of tattooing are generally of permanent type.
Henna tattooing is a temporary form of tattooing. Henna, a type of herbal plant is made into a paste along with coffee or tea, lemon Juice and sugar and applied on to the skin in various areas. These applications may stay for a few days or months – depending on the Henna quality and the application followed.

This article is written by Dagfinn Rognerud, former Norwegian officer. This article may be reproduced as long as all Live links are included. Dagfinn has several pages about tattoos: [http://www.flower-tattoo.info] [http://www.henna-tattoosite.com] [http://www.lower-back-tattoo.com/]

Tattoos - Techniques,

Are Tattoos An Addiction?

The longtime connection between tattoos and individuals of questionable character is not the sole account for why tattoos are frequently given a bad reputation. While of course this connection, which is becoming less and less of a factor as each generation progresses, has been true in many circumstances, the subject of tattoos in the present day has yet another cloud over its reputation; it is darker, and rarely based on the truth.

From both those who know and those who do not, there are frequent insinuations about the “addictive” characteristics of tattooing. Many people sport multiple tattoos; some have acquired them over a number of years or decades, while others make regular trips to their favorite tattoo studios, but arbitrarily labeling this as an “addiction” is unfair, unrealistic, and rarely based in fact. As each person has his or her own individual reason for getting tattoos, it is impossible to know what a person’s reason is unless he or she states it. Some like artwork, some wish to honor a special person, some get tattoos in order to feel a part of some specific group, some people just enjoy spending money. In other words, most people have their own individual reasons for getting tattoos, and it is almost never a matter of being “addicted” to them.

There are two parts of this misconception. Both play a role in giving a bad reputation to the subject of tattoos as well as to the people who elect to get them. The first is that people are addicted to the tattoos themselves; the second misconception is that people are addicted to the process of getting them– specifically, that they are “addicted to pain.” One might wonder the mindset of anyone who states the latter opinion; but it certainly provides quite a scope of misunderstandings on the entire subject.

One tattoo artist, in remarking that tattoos are a “fever,” had been referring to the simple, if odd, enjoyment which many of his clients had in being able to spend money to buy permanent artwork for themselves. “I think I’ll get another one” was something often heard in his studio. This did not constitute “addiction” by any definition of the word. Nor, in his decades of practice as a tattoo artist, did he ever have a customer who even remotely enjoyed the discomfort of the tattooing process.

The word, and its mistaken applicability to tattoos, is often tossed around by those who know too well what the word “addiction” really means. Addiction is a compulsion, something over which a person has no self-control. Addiction cannot differentiate between a “want” and a “need.” Individuals who do have numerous addictions– drugs, alcohol, behaviors, etc.– can very well become addicted to tattoos. However, that is certainly not the case for the majority of people who decide to get them. Most people who get tattoos do so simply because they want them; they do not possess the weakness of character which leads addicts in the position of being compelled to do something.

The concept that a person gets tattoos because he or she is addicted to pain and therefore enjoys the painful process of being tattooed can only come from either the most ignorant or those who have some personal issues of their own.

Unfortunately, both of these misconceptions shed a very negative light on both the subject of tattoos and the people who wear them. It is a bad reputation which neither deserve, for there is almost never any fact in either point of view. While there are those who get tattoos with less than desirable motives, most people who get them do so with no negative attachment to either the tattoos or the process whatsoever. The bottom line is if you find someone who is attempting to convince you that getting tattoos is an addiction, you’ve probably found someone who actually is an addict and does not realize that most people are not.

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